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New Survey Reveals What Irish Workers Really Want

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What do Irish workers really think about their jobs and where they work? How much of our lives are dedicated to work? Are we achieving the work life balance we crave?
Those are the questions a survey of 1,000 workers by Dublin Airport Central set out to answer. Here’s what they found out.

 

1 – Job satisfaction is more important than job security or a good salary

Employers often use salary to compete for staff, but the majority of Irish workers consider job satisfaction to be more important. Workers like to know that they are doing a good job and contributing to the overall success of the company – and they want recognition for that.

The second most important aspect was job security, followed by a good salary. The least important was health insurance.

2. Only 13% of Irish workers said they had a great work/life balance

Only 13% of Irish workers surveyed said that their employer is succeeding in providing a brilliant work life balance, with 9% of us saying the work life balance is terrible.

Respondents highlighted ‘flexible work hours’ as a perk that would make them go the extra mile at work.

 

15% of respondents said ‘better work conditions’ would convince them to move jobs.

 

3. A good salary remains a motivating factor for workers

When asked ‘Which of these would convince you to move jobs?’, 41% responded a ‘higher salary’ was most important, followed by 22% choosing ‘career progression opportunities’.

15% of respondents said ‘better work conditions’ would convince them to move jobs.

 

4. The simple things still matter: quality tea and coffee are what people want!

When asked ‘Which small perk would most help improve your productivity in the workplace? the most popular answer was ‘quality coffee or tea’, followed by a ‘chill out area’ and ‘ergonomic office equipment’.

For respondents aged 18-24, the top answer was a ‘chill out area’, highlighting the changing work expectations and perceptions for post-millennials.

 

18% of workers say they never socialise with colleagues

 

5. How much is work affecting our personal life?

To attempt to understand work/life balance conditions better, respondents were asked, ‘Do you often work overtime?’

50% of respondents said, yes, they often work overtime. Across different ages, those working the most overtime were 45-54 year olds, with 55% of them stating they often work longer hours.

 

6.  A third of Irish workers wouldn’t recommend a friend work at the same company as them.

As happiness in the workplace leads to better productivity, addressing it should be a key concern for employers and an important factor to consider in the lifespan of a company.

A high staff turnover can also prove costly in terms of revenue and the quality of the company’s output, not to mention affecting workplace morale.

 

No matter their age, respondents felt strongly that companies need to do more than just exist for profit.

 

7. How much do we socialise with colleagues?

When asked, ‘How often do you socialise with colleagues?’, 24% of Irish workers responded ‘occasionally’, 18% said ‘never’ and 12% said ‘twice a year.

On the other end of the scale, over 15% of workers socialise with colleagues once a week and a fifth once a month. Perhaps unsurprisingly, a third of those that socialise once a week are 18-24 year olds. In comparison 27% of 35-44 year olds occasionally socialise with colleagues, while 21% say “never”!

 

8. We care about the society we are creating and companies should too.

When asked, ‘If a company positively contributes to society (charities, the environment), would it make you more interested in working there?’ 69% answered yes, it would make them more interested in working for a company.

No matter the age, it was felt strongly that companies need to do more than just exist for profit.

 

www.DublinAirportCentral.com

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