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These Are The Top Skills in Demand By Irish Employers Right Now

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With Ireland almost at full employment, 86% of businesses in a recent survey said they expected to offer employees a pay rise in the coming year, due to concerns over staff being lured away by the greater number of jobs on offer.
Whether you’re looking to get back into the workplace after a period of leave, or feel the need to sharpen your C.V. with some up to date skills, understanding the key skills in demand right now is the first place to start.

 

“Over the past two to three years the demand for UX/UI Designers, Web Developers, Data Scientists and Business Analysts has been phenomenal”, according to Morgan Cummins of TalentHub, a recruitment agency specialising in the placement of digital and technical roles in Ireland.

“As Dublin’s Silicon Dock grows so does the demand. On the digital side of things, right now there is a shortage of talent in the areas of SEO, PPC, Digital Analysts and Social Media.”

“Really there has never been a better time to up skill in these areas, as it will be an educational investment that would payback tenfold over time.”

 

We live in the information era so no matter what sector you work in, the need for technical skills is a must for almost every role.

 

Re-training in an entirely new field is not the only option available – more roles are becoming ‘inter-disciplinary’, combining more traditional positions with the tech skills needed to enhance and future proof the role.

“We live in the information era”, says Morgan, “so no matter what sector you work in, the need for technical skills is a must for almost every role.”

“The most sought-after skills over the past year or so have been Cybersecurity, (which has become of huge importance in recent months due to GDPR), Data Analytical skills and UX/UI web development skills.”

Don’t underestimate the power of ‘softer skills’ too, says Morgan.

“We believe critical thinking, and most importantly strong communication skills, plus high levels of emotional intelligence are vital for the future leaders of tomorrow, alongside the softer skills like treating people with empathy and compassion” says Morgan.

 

Increasingly companies are looking for people with skills in the area of AI, Bitcoin & Data Analytics. These areas are still very new and so any experience is invaluable.

 

“Software Engineering and Data Analytics are probably the most sought after technical skills”, agrees Ciara Garvan, Founder of WorkJuggle, which specialises in flexible, remote and contract work.

WorkJuggle has a strong history of supporting women in technology (through specialist advice and returner workshops) but also recruits across the Marketing, HR and Finance sectors so has a rounded view of the skills most in demand.

“Increasingly companies are looking for people with skills in the area of AI, Bitcoin & Data Analytics. These areas are still very new and so any experience is invaluable. Then there are the solid roles which never really go away – IT Project Managers, Business Analysts – we are hiring for all of these roles at the moment.”

 

Demand for Flexibility Across All Sectors

With more of us now looking for some form of flexibility in our working life, careers in tech have the additional benefit of providing it. Perhaps because the roles are so in demand that employers are open to working around talented recruits, but also because a growing body of research has shown that happier workers means more successful businesses.

Flexible hours and remote options are of huge importance to candidates within the tech industry. It is one of the most sought-after perks that most companies have adapted to, as advances in technology have made remote work a whole lot easier to stay connected with your team.

“Flexibility isn’t just a benefit for employees”, says Morgan, “but also for the employer”.

 

The companies that continue to refuse to offer flexibility will get left behind, as there is now proven links between employee engagement and competitive advantage.

 

“Giving employees more autonomy and the freedom and flexibility to change their hours and workspace has proven to make them more productive. The companies that continue to refuse to offer this flexibility will get left behind, as there is now proven links between employee engagement and competitive advantage.”

But, Ciara warns, “flexibility only really happens in a high trust environment, and it is increasingly important for employees to feel they are a trusted and respected part of the team.”

“Increasingly we see younger people look for that kind of autonomy and trust earlier on in their careers then ever before. In later stages when parents are juggling the demands of small children flexibility becomes even more important.”

 

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